Stories for February 2005

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Thursday, February 24

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Old-fashioned Western justice needed with Grace

To the Editor:

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Social Security debate could produce good

To the Editor:

Gurine Wilkins
February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Gurine Wilkins

Gurine Wilkins, 54, died on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2005, at her home in Libby.

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Delegation opposed to president's BPA proposal

By STEVE KADEL Western News Reporter

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Tibetan program at LCC called informative

To the Editor:

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

W.R. Grace funded studies ignored by government safety net

To the Editor:

Larry Pennock III
February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Larry Pennock III

Larry Duane Pennock II, 26, of Bonners Ferry, died on Feb. 19, 2005, as a result of a snowmobile accident near Highland Flats.

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

W.R. Grace execs plead not guilty

Six current and former W.R. Grace officials pleaded not guilty in federal court in Missoula Tuesday to charges including conspiracy, Clean Air Act violations and wire fraud.

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Dreaming It, Doing It

Kudos to the Libby Area Chamber of Commerce on their new sign.

February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Fire service expansion postponed

By BRENT SHRUM Western News Reporter

Patricia Peterson
February 24, 2005 11 p.m.

Patricia Peterson

Patricia A. (Pat) Peterson, 52, of Libby, died Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2005, at Kalispell Regional Medical Center.

Tuesday, February 22

Bronze Medal awarded to slain Marine
February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Bronze Medal awarded to slain Marine

By STEVE KADEL Western News Reporter

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Bus ride to Helena well-supported by elected officials

To the Editor:

Ernest Williams
February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Ernest Williams

Ernest B. Williams, 82, of Troy, died on Thursday, Feb. 17, 2005, at the Libby Care Center.

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Bill seeks to offset declining school enrollment

By STEVE KADEL Western News Reporter

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Cleanup contractor spitting in faces of Libby residents

To the Editor:

Gordon McComas
February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Gordon McComas

Former Libby resident Paul Gordon McComas, 85, of Eugene, Ore., died on Feb. 11, 2005.

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

'Small spills' called silly and unimportant waste of money

To the Editor:

John Rosenquist
February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

John Rosenquist

John A. Rosenquist, 72, of Libby, died on Friday, Feb. 18, 2005.

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Baucus proposes Missoula research center

BY ROGER MORRIS Western News Publisher

Gerald Anderson
February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Gerald Anderson

Gerald M. Anderson, 66, of Libby, died on Feb. 4, 2005, at his home on the Kootenai River.

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Constitutionalist shares political evolution though parties

To the Editor:

February 22, 2005 11 p.m.

Two of everything

I'm pretty sure it was the great character actor Strother Martin who said those infamous lines in the

Monday, February 21

This is a news headline
February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

This is a news headline

This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Baucus proposes Missoula research center

BY ROGER MORRIS Western News Publisher

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Public Notice

This is a notice This is a notice This is a notice This is a notice This is a notice This is a notice

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Want to make The Western News your browser's homepage?

Microsoft Internet Explorer users:

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Sunday, May 30, 2004

Americans pay tribute on Memorial Day to those who fell in battle defending our country. The observance had its beginning following the Civil War. Today we honor all of America's war dead-those who died so that freedom might live.

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Wednesday,     June 2, 2004

* The primary will be held June 8 and all who are registered may vote.

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

'Small spills' called silly and unimportant waste of money

To the Editor: Here are some random thoughts, for some of the pseudo intellects that write their long articles and opinions, "Suck It Up!" Regarding the front page article titled "Small Spills," I have never read such an unimportant, silly article in my life, as if the "sky was falling." Talk about a waste of money and resources, I have an idea, put on a face mask if you must and suck it up with an invention called a "Hoover." Small spills my arse! An opinion by Thomas Powers is a perfect example of why people should home school, then let kids earn their own way through college, they might see life as it really is by then and appreciate the value of a dollar, instead of mom and dad "expected" to pay for everything as if it was a given right. He acts as if loggers have no idea why mills are shutting down, only a pseudo professor can explain it to us! How dare the loggers or miners for that matter have the audacity to complain! He can explain it to us. It never has had anything to do with special interest groups, lawsuits or tree huggers, you silly logging families. Hey, but wait! With the drought even worse this year and all the dead, bug-infested trees ready to explode, you may get a job this summer. We'll get fires, sooner or later we may lose our homes, animals and lives, but what the heck, they know so much more how to take care of our environment. Aren't we lucky! Mr. Morris, and Steve Barrett, I suggest you go to C-span, pull up some archives, the Senate (the Democrats) have held up bills for years. In regard to the lawsuits, this has been in the making for years! Especially asbestos settlements, the Democrats - Mr. Daschle would not let it come to a vote because of their special interest groups - the trial lawyers. The Republicans had money for the people who really have asbestos diseases, not something that may be related, diagnosed by real doctors. But then if that happened you couldn't make hundreds of more small companies go bankrupt, and trial lawyers wouldn't get their bank accounts full. They are the people who have been selfish, as if they really care who is ill or dying or who has died. As for all these small communities drying up, people having to move or travel afar for other jobs, economy that was supporting the communities now gone and still going. You may have big dreams and volunteers but you have to have the economy and people here, the hustle and bustle that once was here is now gone with a lot of businesses that have left too, over the years. I've seen it in town after town in the Northwest. As the saying goes, "Be careful what you wish for" now that you got it, we all have to live with the results. Thanks a lot. Lynn Griner Cleanup contractor spitting in faces of Libby residents To the Editor: This letter is in regards to the hiring practice that MCS is doing. It was my understanding that when these companies were giving the contracts to clean up the asbestos here in Libby they were to hire local workers. Well something is wrong with this picture then. The guy representing MCS at the job fair said they do not hire local that they bring back their own crew from Spokane aka IRS and that if they get the next contract they may consider hiring Libby help but no promises. What kind of crap is that? There are so many people here in Libby in need of work and trained for it, what is the problem? If they don't want to hire us then get out of town so someone who will hire Libby people can get the work. They are taking money out of our town and giving nothing back, they underbid the other companies so that they can get all the work and turn around and spit in our faces by not hiring our people. You tell me what is wrong with this picture. Ann Kowalski Bus ride to Helena well- supported by elected officials To the Editor: The bus trip to Helena showing support for the Montanore mine project had broad support from the south Lincoln County community, our county commissioners and our legislators. In spite of nearly 6 hours each going and coming there was an overload of passengers and other vehicles were recruited to ferry the overload. Five thirty a.m. is not an easy time to start on an excursion but everyone was enthusiastic concerning the cause. Senator Aubyn Curtiss met us in the rotunda of the capitol to voice her support for the cause and her regret that she could not join us in our meeting with the governor. She stated that her heart is with us but a very important meeting had to take precedence and she knew that our other legislators would be joining our group meeting. Representatives Rick Maedje and Ralph Heinert did join us and our Commissioners, Rita Windom, Marianne Roose and John Konzen and Mayor Tony Berget were with us in our entreaty to the Governor to expedite the Montanore mine. The governor assured us that he supports the natural resource industries and intends to support the mine within the bounds of his office. Of course, our group hopes that this means that the mine will be permitted to begin operations within a year. The governor's appointee as director of the Department of Environmental Quality, Richard Oppeer, noted that he is married to a Libby native. Spirits were high on leaving the governor's office. We all felt that we were at the very least trying to influence our own futures and hopefully making a difference in the future of Lincoln County and the state of Montana. Teddye Beebe Constitutionalist shares political evolution though parties To the Editor: The other day I showed the "enclosed paper," that I put together back on the Nov. 11th "Armistice Day" of 2004 to a friend. He said "I ought to send it into the newspaper because people should know!" So after a bit of thought on the matter here it is: As a Navy vet, (1950-1952) of the Korean War I have voted now some 53 years. First as a Democrat; then non-partisan; thirdly as a Republican. Now at 73 years of age I'll vote and be an activist of the Constitutional Party. Why you ask? It's the refusal of both Democrat and Republican senators, congressmen and governors to write or speak plainly to the issues below listed! 1. To close the Mexican border (California to Texas) to stop the illegal alien flood! 2. Refusal to require all illegals be sent back! 3. Because English is America's spoken and written language we need to require that it be so on all legal papers (ballots, licenses, etc.) by law. 4. The enactment of a "1940's style Bracero Program" as existed then, none but the workers to come over to work in agriculture, no families. 5. Require all emigrants to speak and read English; know American history and of our Constitution on entry. 6. That the Congress kill the harmful NAFTA, GATT and WTO treaties. 7. Get the United States out of the U.N., and the U.N. out of the USA! 8. Pass a 2-term limit on the Senate and House as applies to the presidency. 9. Pass a 10-year limit on Supreme Court justices. 10. Close the constitutionally illegal Dept. of "Non" Education, that eats taxes and teaches neither child or teacher, but only grossly interferes in all local school districts. 11. Make the recent tax cuts permanent. 12. Return to all of the states west of the Mississippi their forest and range lands that past governments have confiscated in violation of the Constitution's Article 1, see number 8 and Article 4, see numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and Amendments 10, 5 and 9. Comment! All of this is a part of the "Sage Brush Rebellions" (Nevada/Oct. 1964) "Equal Footing Doctrine!" "The new states enter on an equal standing as the first 13 states." 13. Require a 200-mile "sea limit" as respects oil, minerals and fisheries, that other countries apply to their benefit and our loss. Freeman Johnson Troy

Bronze Medal awarded to slain Marine
February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Bronze Medal awarded to slain Marine

By STEVE KADEL Western News Reporter

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Two of everything

I'm pretty sure it was the great character actor Strother Martin who said those infamous lines in the movie Cool Hand Luke, "What we have here is a failure to communicate." So true. First, we have two joint resolutions coming out of the state senate judiciary committee. One is being carried by Lincoln County's Aubyn Curtiss and the other is being carried by Dan Harrington of Butte. I know the asbestos victims and representatives of the victims, and just about every other asbestos-something in this community, have been talking to Harrington since the first week of the legislative session. I'm not sure who has been talking to Curtiss. I know two years ago when she successfully got a resolution through both houses seeking a research center in Libby, there was some surprise at the suspicious reaction from the asbestos victims. There was never any communication between the two then and apparently not now. After all, Curtiss' resolution refers to the asbestos victims as "litigants." That's not true. Not everyone diagnosed with ARD is a litigant in a court case. It appears, Curtiss' resolution was drafted a full month after Harrington's. If the senator from Fortine feels new hostility from the asbestos victims, it's because she hasn't communicated with them. It's not that people aren't thankful for her efforts, just suspicious of her motivation since there hasn't been direct communication. Let's take a step up. U.S. Sen. Max Baucus, who has gone out of his way during the past five years to help Libby with various things related to the asbestos crisis - from cleanup to health care — is coming to town to talk about the research center and health-care issues. A public meeting is scheduled Thursday at 1:30 p.m. in the Libby City Council chambers. There won't be enough space. Anyway, there hasn't been any communication between Baucus or his staff and the Center for Asbestos Related Disease here in Libby since CARD board members traveled to D.C. to lobby for support. That's about a year ago, if not more. Then last week, Baucus sent out a news release saying he asked Mike Leavitt, now the secretary of Health and Human Services and formerly the EPA administrator, for funding for research centers in Libby and Missoula. Say what? There has been a gargantuan struggle going on behind the scenes between CARD and University of Montana people who are suddenly looking like the proverbial 900-pound gorilla. It appears U of M researchers want everything their way and don't want to play by the rules CARD is setting so that research on Libby's asbestos victims becomes economic development, too, for the community. If Missoula has its way, Libby will have the victims, who will continue to seek health care for their illness, and Missoula will be a sink hole for the research dollars and related economic development. To fight a 900-pound gorilla, you have to be united. And it's obvious we're not that when our own state senator isn't talking to asbestos victims. Hopefully the U.S. senator can enlighten us. - Roger Morris

Gerald Anderson
February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Gerald Anderson

Gerald M. Anderson, 66, of Libby, died on Feb. 4, 2005, at his home on the Kootenai River. He was born on Sept. 12, 1938, at Hillsdale, Mich., to Clifford and Viola Anderson. Preceded in death by his parents, Jerry is survived by his children, Brock Anderson of Bozeman, and Ashley Anderson of Boulder, Colo. Jerry is remembered as an accomplished businessman who managed his own commercial real estate appraisal practice and was an active member and former president of the Colorado chapter of the Appraisal Institute. A man who shaped his children's lives through his passion for the outdoors, reading, learning and travel, Jerry could be found cheering his daughter on during high school basketball games, instructing his son in the fine art of casting a Caddis fly to a rising trout or manning the grill at his children's graduation or special events. His friends remember him as someone who pursued many endeavors and adventures in life. Whether it was model trains, strategic card games, commercial real estate appraisal, home remodeling, flying or academia, Jerry achieved expertise in everything he did. Above all else, Jerry possessed a passion for the Montana wilderness and shared this passion with his family. The happiest days of his life took place with a fly-rod in hand and his family close by on rivers and streams throughout the west. One place in particular captured the essence of his personality, the Smith River at Two Creek. Lazy aummer days wirh leisurely breakfasts by the wood-burning stove and consisted of one family decision about the activities planned for the day: "Do we head upstream or downstream?" The answer to this question never really mattered as he was always at peace with the feel of the sun on his back, the tug of the fly-rod in his hand and the cold, swift waters rushing over his feet. A celebration of Jerry's life will be held during March in Boulder. His family can be contacted at 303-746-7648 for further details. Donations in his honor may be sent to Montana Trout Unlimited, P.O. Box 7186, Missoula Mt 59807, or by calling 406-543-0054. Gordon McComas Former Libby resident Paul Gordon McComas, 85, of Eugene, Ore., died on Feb. 11, 2005. He was born on April 25, 1919, at Somers, one of the seven children of Asa and Effie Mae McComas. He grew up at Libby, working at a butcher shop during the Depression, contributing to the family income. While in junior high school, Gordon met Gerry Hough and they remained sweethearts through high school and college. They were married in June 1942 while Gordon was home on leave from service with the U.S. Army. Gordon completed his tour of duty in England and finished college at Stanford University where he majored in economics. He planned to become a high school history teacher, but the demands of supporting a growing family led him in a different direction. With his wife Gerry and their three children, Gordon moved to the San Francisco Bay Area where he worked for more than 20 years for J.C. Penney's before launching his own women's clothing stores, Adrienne's, with branches from Santa Rosa to Palo Alto. In 1970 they had the opportunity to relocate to the tropical island of Guam, intending to stay for two years Gordon's tenure at the Townhouse department store in Guam lasted for 25 years. Gordon and Gerry enjoyed the beaches, the people and the travel opportunities, returning often to the states to visit family members and friends. After Gerry's sudden death in 1989, Gordon continued to live and work on Guam until he retired at the age of 76, moving to Eugene to be near his family, associating himself with his son Gavin, owner of Sundance Natural Foods, Wine Cellars and mercantile stores. Gordon's passion for politics, foreign affairs and social justice never wavered. Outspoken about his own ideas, he was receptive to those of others. Full of life, interested in people, places and ideas, Gordon was a faithful friend, returning often to the Libby area to visit. In retirement he also traveled to Bali, Thailand, New Zealand, Ireland and Scotland. An energetic gardener, an avid reader, a fitness buff with a genuine interest in people, Gordon had a knack for recognizing the best in others. He rarely failed to charm those he met and his devotion to his family never wavered, evidencing itself in deep and unconditional support of those he loved. His later years were enhanced by his relationship with Ursala Zimmerman McComas of Mill Valley, Calif. Gordon's death came after a short and intense battle with cancer and pneumonia. Survivors include his children, Gavin, Eugene; Pam in Portland, and Gordon in Napa Valley. He will also be greatly missed by grandson Christopher, in Los Angeles, granddaughter Aubrey, a student at Brown University in Rhode Island, and grandson Dillon, a middle school student in Napa. John Rosenquist John A. Rosenquist, 72, of Libby, died on Friday, Feb. 18, 2005. He was born on Feb. 10, 1933, at Deer River, Minn., to Swede and Frances Rosenquist and came to Libby as a child. John attended Libby schools and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1951. He was stationed in Germany for the better part of his tour of duty. John married Carol Nelson on March 1, 1958, and they have lived at Libby throughout their 47 years of marriage. John worked for the J. Neils Lumber Company, St. Regis and Champion in various capacities, including end loader operator, brakeman and locomotive operator. Health problems forced his retirement in 1985. John belonged to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Disabled American Veterans, Eagles, Cabinet View Country Club and the American Bowling Congress. His children and grandchildren were the sunshine and spice of John's life. He was a devoted husband and an honest and loyal friend. A student of life, John worked to improve everything that he touched, whether it was golfing, fishing, woodworking, bowling or finding the best route to visit family. He had incredible patience and persistence. John was preceded in death by his parents. Survivors include his wife Carol, Libby; sons John Jr, Libby, and Randy (Robin), Spokane; daughters Teri and her husband Mike Nielsen, Kalispell, and Kathi Bales, Libby; grandchildren Candice, Chris and Spencer in Kalispell; Kelli and Jared in Spokane and Laura and Alyssa, Libby and great-grandchildren Kaileigh, Samuel, Emma and Skyler, Kalispell. Services were conducted at 11 a.m. on Tuesday at Christ Lutheran Church followed by lunch at the church after the graveside service. Arrangements are under direction of the Nelson & Vial Funeral Home. The family suggests donations in John's name to the American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Ave., Dallas, Texas 75231-4596, the American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, or Libby Volunteer Ambulance. Ernest Williams Ernest B. Williams, 82, of Troy, died on Thursday, Feb. 17, 2005, at the Libby Care Center. He was born on April 18, 1922, to Cleve and Francis Williams at Hazelwood, N.C., and spent his childhood in North Carolina. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1942, serving in the Pacific during World War 11. Ernie was honorably discharged in January 1946, and was married to Marie Anthony later that year. He worked in construction as a heavy equipment operator, coming to the Troy area in 1957 to work in construction and logging. Ernie prospected in the area and was the original locater of the Asarco mine. He also prospected in the area of the Grouse Mountain mine. He operated Williams Manufacturing producing and selling mining implements. Ernie also made custom hunting knives and as an avid outdoorsman, enjoyed hunting and fishing. Survivors include his wife Marie, Troy; children Francis Kuntz and her husband Raymond, Montpelier, N.D.; Sandra Downey and her husband Gary, Libby; Bill Williams and his wife Becky, Troy; Darlene McNaughton and her husband Ken, Juneau, Alaska; Candy Williams, Bonners Ferry, Idaho; Dan Williams and his wife Lola, Troy, and Jim Williams and his wife Valerie, Juneau; step- daughters Elsie Yates, Montrose, Colo., and Judy Johnson and her husband Jack in Arkansas, sister Macie Williams, Waynesville, N.C., and numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Services were conducted at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Nelson & Vial Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Gene Bushnell officiating. Interment with military honors followed at Milnor Lake Cemetery. Visitation was from 9 a.m. on Tuesday until service time.

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

This is a sports headline

This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story This is the story

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN CHURCH

Services conducted by Pastor Jack Shannon, 837-4387. Worship Services: 8:30 a.m. & 10:00 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 9:30 a.m.

February 21, 2005 11 p.m.

Bill seeks to offset declining school enrollment

By STEVE KADEL Western News Reporter

Thursday, February 17

February 17, 2005 11 p.m.

Schools down 61 students

By Brent Shrum, Western News Reporter

Lester Nitschke
February 17, 2005 11 p.m.

Lester Nitschke

Lester L. Nitschke, 74, of Libby, died on Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2005, at St. John¹s Lutheran Hospital.

February 17, 2005 11 p.m.

Sports program targets higher ground

By Steve Kadel, Western News Reporter

February 17, 2005 11 p.m.

Libby lobbies for fast track for mine

By Steve Kadel, Western News Reporter

Charlie Brown
February 17, 2005 11 p.m.

Charlie Brown

Charles (Charlie) M. Brown, 72, of Libby, died on Feb. 11, 2005, at the Veterans¹ Hosptal in Spokane.

Tuesday, February 15

February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Escudero faces time in prison

The suspect who sparked a police chase that led to the death of a Libby teen in 2003 has entered into a plea agreement that includes the dismissal of the most serious charge against him.

February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Help needed on small spills says mayor

By Roger Morris Western News Publisher

Mick Mills
February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Mick Mills

Longtime Libby resident and community volunteer Franklin A. (Mick) Mills, 81, died on Feb. 9, 2005, at Sandpoint, Idaho.

Robert Hampton
February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Robert Hampton

Robert E. (Tumbleweed) Hampton, 59, died on Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2005, at St. John¹s Lutheran Hospital.

Lorainne Petrusha
February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Lorainne Petrusha

Longtime Libby resident and retired nurse Lorainne Petrusha, 79, died on Friday, Feb. 11, 2005, at Kalispell.

February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Three Œbugs¹ hitting Libby area hard

By Steve Kadel Western News Reporter

Georgina Bardole
February 15, 2005 11 p.m.

Georgina Bardole

Georgina E. Bardole, 82, died on Friday, Feb. 11, 2005, at her home in Libby.

Thursday, February 10

February 10, 2005 11 p.m.

Charges rely on company memos

By Steve Kadel Western News Reporter

February 10, 2005 11 p.m.

Mine lobby group to see governor

A Libby contingent is organizing to lobby Gov. Brian Schweitzer on Tuesday, Feb. 15, in Helena to speed up the permitting process for the proposed Montanore Mine.

Ethel Bustillos
February 10, 2005 11 p.m.

Ethel Bustillos

Ethel (Marie) Shelley Bustillos, 81, died Feb. 7, 2005, at the Libby Care Center.

February 10, 2005 11 p.m.

County scraps jail remodel

By Brent Shrum Western News Reporter

Tuesday, February 8

Ruth Wert
February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Ruth Wert

Former Troy resident Ruth Irene Litch Wert, 89, died on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2005, at the Ferry County Memorial Hospital Nursing Home in Republic, Wash., where she had lived for the past five and a half years.

Edwin Cripe
February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Edwin Cripe

Edwin Willis Cripe, 91, of Hermiston, Ore., died on Nov. 24, 2004.

Geneva McCrory
February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Geneva McCrory

Geneva McCrory, 92, a former Havre resident, died on Jan. 27, 2005, at the Libby home of her daughter.

February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Grace indictments handed down

A federal grand jury in Missoula has indicted W.R. Grace along with seven current and former company executives for knowingly concealing information about adverse health effects of the asbestos mining operation Grace ran here for 27 years.

Howard Orr
February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Howard Orr

Howard Orr, 62, of Libby, died on Friday, Feb. 4, 2005, at St. John¹s Lutheran Hospital.

John Norberg
February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

John Norberg

John Melvin Norberg Jr., 67, of Libby, died on Friday, Feb. 4, 2005, at Kalispell of heart failure.

February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Charette examines downtown features

By Roger Morris Western News Publisher

February 8, 2005 11 p.m.

Troy planners seek public input

By Roger Morris Western News Publisher

Thursday, February 3

February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

Montana Corps eyes local summer effort

By Steve Kadel Western News Reporter

February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

Tourism coalition gaining support

The Lincoln County Commissioners are the latest to sign on to a plan to create a countywide tourism coalition.

Dean Adkins
February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

Dean Adkins

Dean Adkins, 67, of Libby, died Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2005, at St. John¹s Lutheran Hospital.

James Johnson
February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

James Johnson

Longtime Libby building contractor James E. Johnson, 87, died on Feb. 1, 2005, at the Libby Care Center.

Rose Holzer
February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

Rose Holzer

Rose R. Holzer, 82, of Libby, died Feb. 1, 2005, at St. John¹s Lutheran Hospital.

February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

Partial roof decided for grandstand

By Brent Shrum Western News Reporter

Greg Kambel
February 3, 2005 11 p.m.

Greg Kambel

Greg Kambel, 46, of Libby, died Monday, Jan. 31, 2005, while playing his favorite game of weekly basketball.

Tuesday, February 1

February 1, 2005 11 p.m.

Students pen plan for post and rail firm

By Brent Shrum Western News Reporter

Henry Holter
February 1, 2005 11 p.m.

Henry Holter

Henry Holter, 67, died on Thursday, Jan. 27, 2005, at Libby.

Ray Remp
February 1, 2005 11 p.m.

Ray Remp

Raymond H. (Ray) Remp, 73, Libby native and longtime Kootenai Valley resident, died on Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2005, at Pahrump, Nev.

Carliss Alderman
February 1, 2005 11 p.m.

Carliss Alderman

Former Libby resident Carliss Alderman, 58, of Carson City, Nev., died on Jan. 26, 2005, at Reno, Nev.

February 1, 2005 11 p.m.

Hurst announces mill closing

The Owens & Hurst Lumber Co. mill in Eureka will be shutting down permanently this spring.

February 1, 2005 11 p.m.

Hospital foundation moves closer to $1 million goal

By Roger Morris Western News Publisher