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Marvin G. Mackey, 88 of Libby

| September 3, 2013 1:57 PM

Marvin George Mackey, 88, passed away from complications of lung cancer on Aug. 27, 2013, at his home in Libby. 

He was born Jan. 12, 1925, to Evert and Florence Hays Mackey in Copeland, Idaho.  The family moved to Bonners Ferry, Idaho, later that year where Marvin grew up and graduated from Bonners Ferry High School on May 30, 1943. 

He was the first in that school’s history to achieve a high school diploma in only three years.

Marvin enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps Cadet Program in lieu of being drafted into the regular Army. This allowed him to finish high school before reporting for basic training in June 1943. 

He attended the 90-day flying school program at the Agricultural College in Cedar City, Utah, then radio school and gunnery school before being assigned to a crew in June 1944. 

He served as nose gunner in a B-24 bomber based in England. He completed 12 missions before his plane crashed and burned shortly after takeoff on Mission No. 13 on Dec. 27, 1944. Nine crew members perished with only three survivors. Marvin was severely burned and spent three months recovering in a hospital in England. 

He was honorably discharged from the service on Oct. 15, 1945.

On June 23, 1946, Marvin married Lillian Marie Johansson, a Libby native. They were blessed with three children, Tym, Dan and Pam. A niece, Glenice Nass, also lived with the Mackeys at times and was considered part of the immediate family.

In his youth, Marvin worked with his father in farming and logging, using horses extensively. After his military service, Marvin was employed at J. Neils Lumber, Co., in Libby for three years prior to attending Kinman Business University in Spokane. He achieved associate degrees in business administration and accounting. He joined the staff at First State Bank in Libby in 1951 where he worked until 1956 when he moved his family to Juneau, Alaska. He was employed at B.M. Behrand’s Bank until 1960, at which time he accepted the challenge to start a new Bank of Anacortes in Anacortes, Wash. 

Marvin served as president of that institution from 1960 until his retirement in 1982. Later, he was called upon to start a bank in Clayton, Ga., reorganize a bank in Yakima, Wash., and other short-term trouble-shooting positions.

Marvin contributed to his community wherever he lived by working in civic organizations as well as those groups related to his profession. He was active in the Washington Banker’s Association, serving terms as treasurer and president. 

He was vice president of the American Banker’s Association. Marvin was a member of the National Leadership Conference and traveled to Washington, D.C., where he lobbied on behalf of the bank groups. He served as president of the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce, president of the Hospital Medical Foundation board, organizer and commodore of Fidalgo Yacht Club, president of Rotary, life member of Nile Masonic Temple and VFW and was appointed Washington governor’s committees and task forces for Govs. Dixie Lee Ray and Dan Evans. He was an avid golfer.

In 1993, Marvin and Lillian moved back to Libby where their marriage began. They enjoyed several years of retirement and relaxation before Lillian’s health deteriorated, and she passed away in 2006. In May, 2008, Marvin married longtime family friend Phyllis Eide Minde. They filled the next five years with world cruises and golf.

Preceding Marvin in death were his wife of 60 years,  Lillian, and his son, Dan. 

He is survivedby his wife, Phyllis of Libby; son, Tym of Seattle; daughter,  Pam (Beaman) Cummings of West Boylston, Mass.; special niece, Glenice Nass Clark; granddaughters,  Patience Mackey of  San Tan Valley, Ariz.; Jessie Heroux of Worcester, Mass.; and several nieces and nephews. 

Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013, at Christ Lutheran Church. 

Arrangements are by Schnackenberg & Nelson Funeral Home & Crematory in Libby. Memorials may be made to Christ Lutheran Church or to the donor’s choice.